10 Biggest Cats in the World, From Large to Extra-Extra Large

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Eurasian Lynx

The largest lynx species may not be the biggest cat, but its size and features make it a formidable presence, with pointed ears and a spotted coat.

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Bottom Line: Cheetah

Cheetahs, with their incredible speed, can reach 64 mph in just three seconds, surpassing Usain Bolt's record of 27 mph. Agile and swift hunters, they are true masters of speed.

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Snow Leopard

Snow leopards stand out with their thick white-greyish fur and long tails, allowing them to navigate snowy slopes. Their appearance and adaptability make them unique among large cats.

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Leopard

Leopards are impressive with their size, athleticism, and leaping abilities. They can cover great distances in a single leap and are skilled climbers, making them formidable in the wild.

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Cougar

Cougars, also known as pumas or mountain lions, are large and adaptable cats found in diverse ecosystems. They resemble oversized house cats, weighing up to 150 pounds.

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Jaguar

Jaguars, named for their lethal leaps, once had a wide range but now inhabit mainly the Amazon rainforest and Pantanal wetlands, with only 173,000 left.

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Lion

Lions, mostly found in Africa, have male lions as the largest with thick manes that indicate dominance and provide protection during fights.

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Bengal Tiger

Bengal tigers, large cats from East Asia, can weigh up to 300 pounds. They are slightly smaller than Siberian tigers, with a bright yellow to orange color.

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Siberian Tiger

Siberian tigers are the largest recorded tigers, native to Russia. Adapted to snowy conditions, their thick coats and high-altitude skills set them apart. Sadly, their population has drastically declined due to habitat loss.

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Liger

Ligers, lion-tiger hybrids, don't occur naturally. Tigons, tiger-lion hybrids, are smaller. These unique crosses result from human intervention, as lions and tigers have different habitats.

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